The Liberty of Open Access
The Liberty of Open Access
  • Martin Wood, Editor in Chief

I’m incredibly proud of the work we’ve done for people living with diabetes through The PLAID Journal so far. In 5 issues, we’ve published 22 research and review articles related to people living with diabetes, and 22 editorials from our readers detailing the ins and outs of daily life with a chronic disease. We’ve also published 7 pieces called “Moving Forward,” aimed at providing insights and ideas to make the future brighter, for people with diabetes and others.

Through taking a chance on The PLAID Journal and allowing us the opportunity to share their work, researchers, physicians, and healthcare professionals working in the field of diabetes have broken through the traditional publishing cost barriers to share their work directly with people living with diabetes. Thanks to support from the Florida State University College of Medicine and the Charlotte Edwards Maguire Medical Library, gone are the days of not being able to read useful and groundbreaking diabetes research because of it costing too much to access. Have you seen what our authors have discovered and allowed us to openly share with a world of people with diabetes?

We have shared research to solve the riddle of what people living with diabetes can do to treat a low blood sugar the night before a surgical procedure, defying common advice to not consume any food or drink given to us from many well-meaning physicians. This is one of my favorite pieces that we’ve brought to the masses that has such an important practical application.

Our researchers have considered the impacts of closed-loop insulin pump systems on relationships of people with diabetes. While we eagerly wait for smarter insulin pumps that actively adjust insulin rates based on continuous glucose monitor data to come to market, we are already thinking about how these technologies are going to change how we live with diabetes in our most intimate relationships.

Speaking of partners, our researchers have examined the toll of life with type 1 diabetes on our partners as caregivers. It’s part of the scope of The PLAID Journal to make space for consideration of those people who care about us the most. After all, they are people living with and inspired by diabetes too!

It’s not just about type 1 diabetes, however. Research attempting to understand stress among adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a young age was published in our very first issue. We know that our friends who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a younger age are just as important as those who are diagnosed later in life.

We are still building the research pipeline for The PLAID Journal. We’re still new, and still growing our base. We are now listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, which is a pretty big deal, highlighting that our journal is FREE to read and FREE for authors to submit their work to thanks to the Florida State University College of Medicine covering our publishing costs. We have a rigorous peer review process, so you can trust that the research and review articles that we share have been vetted, and are just as legitimate as any other diabetes research journal out there.

In this issue of The PLAID Journal, we continue to show the world that people living with diabetes and people working with diabetes can benefit greatly by reading the same information. We’re always accepting research submissions for future issues too, so if you’re a researcher working on anything relating to people living with diabetes and you’re looking for a home for your research, we welcome you with open arms.

People with diabetes, healthcare professionals, and researchers working together will improve the new technologies coming to market, like smarter insulin pumps and better glucose meters. Working together will improve our understanding of the impacts of chronic conditions on all of the parties who contribute to living well with diabetes.

If you are a researcher and have work to share that benefits people living with diabetes, I hope you will contact us at The PLAID Journal. If you have research that has been rejected elsewhere, for whatever reason, give our editorial team a chance to work with you. We have proven through our work so far that we can promote your research, and highlight how it impacts people living with diabetes. We want to publish those new ideas that don’t necessarily fit in traditional publishing spaces.

If you are a person living with diabetes, I urge you to read The PLAID Journal. Find an Audience Perspective, a research article, a review article, or a Moving Forward that speaks to you. Share it on social media, and help us get the word out to others that what we are doing is for YOU. Your reading and sharing is what will help ensure that The PLAID Journal, a journal for and by people living with diabetes, remains relevant and continues to improve all of our lives.

We’re just getting started, and I look forward to partnering with our readers and our researchers to grow The PLAID Journal. I encourage you to help us show the world that an open access journal that connects people living with diabetes and people inspired by diabetes has a place in academic and scientific literature alongside diabetes journals made distinctly for researchers with budgets big enough to afford traditional publishing fees. Help me prove that we, people living with and inspired by diabetes, deserve more.

--MARTIN

Give me your tired (research), your poor (researchers),
your huddled masses (of research ideas) yearning to breathe free,
the wretched refuse (of articles denied by other publishers)
of your teeming shore (of ideas).

Send these, the homeless (drafts), tempest-tost (during peer review) to me.

I lift my lamp (lit by the dreams of soon-to-be published researchers)
beside the golden door (of opportunity and successful publication).

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17125/plaid.2017.103

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Copyright (c) 2017 PLAID - People Living with And Inspired by Diabetes